• RHF-SECONDARY-ABOUT-US

Frequently Asked Questions

General FAQs

Why are there 5g of sugar in the plain kefir?

The sugar listed is lactose that occurs naturally in the milk. We do not add sugar.

Why are there 7g of sugar in the plain yogurt?

The sugar listed is lactose that occurs naturally in the milk. We do not add sugar.

Do you still sell goat milk?

As of September 14, 2012, we no longer sell our fresh bottled goat milk. Because goat milk production is seasonal, there are times of the year when we have less fresh milk than others. Coupled with the fact that our goat milk yogurt and kefir are very popular, we have decided to discontinue bottling our fresh milk. You may wish to enjoy our delicious Redwood Hill Farm Goat Milk Kefir in place of the milk; many people use our kefir on their cereal, over fruit, and in their smoothies. Thank you for your continued support!

Why are you not non-GMO verified?

At Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery we are deeply concerned about the widespread use of GMOs in our food system and the lack of GMO labeling. We fully support the Non-GMO Project and the different state initiatives seeking the labeling of GMOs.

Our position is simple: We do not support genetic engineering of food products. The ingredients we use in our goat dairy yogurts, kefirs and cheeses do not contain DNA from GMOs. All of our suppliers provide specifications, which ensure the non-GMO status of the ingredients we add.

Our goats’ diet consists of 70% hay and brush, and 30% grain. The vegetarian grain formula we feed the goats contains no hormones, antibiotics, animal by-products or preservatives. At this time, we cannot guarantee that the goat feed is always free of GMOs.

We are actively working toward becoming organic and non-GMO in the future for the benefit of all. At this time, we are in the process of evaluating what the transition process will involve for the farms and for the creamery. If we find that becoming certified organic is feasible (and we very much hope we will!), it will take some time – most likely several years.

Can I freeze, bake or cook with your products?

Yes; our yogurt, kefir and chèvre goat cheese can be frozen.  Always thaw in the refrigerator, which can take up to 24 hours. The texture of the yogurt or kefir may be affected and will not be as creamy, however the probiotics and nutritional benefits will not be compromised.

Our French-style, rind-ripened goat cheeses can also be frozen, but when thawed do not showcase as well as prior to freezing. The nutrient content will remain the same. A good way to use these cheeses after freezing would be in cooking.

In recipes, our products are wonderful substitutes for other dairy products and we have many delicious recipes on our website categorized by meal type. Please keep in mind that the probiotics are alive and active and their nutritional digestive properties will be compromised when heated above 120 degrees. What is your favorite recipe? We love to hear about the recipes you use with our goat milk products; share them on our Facebook page!

What is the difference between kefir and yogurt?

Yogurt and kefir are similar in taste and texture; however kefir is drinkable . . . like a thick smoothie, while yogurt is like custard. The yogurt, with the addition of small amounts of tapioca starch and pectin, is thicker. Our kefirs do not contain anything to thicken them. Our kefirs contain Flourish®, a custom blend of 10 different probiotics, compared to our yogurts which contain 4. Both are delicious and contain billions of probiotics in every serving!

Where can I find your products? Do you ship directly to customers?

We can direct ship our cheese! Call us at (707) 823-8250 to place an order or to check on existing orders.

We do not ship our yogurt or kefir directly to consumers because the weight would result in extremely high shipping costs, and also because the transportation process is too rough on the product, resulting in more liquidity. Please visit our store locator or talk to the dairy buyer at your local store if they do not currently carry the products you are looking for.

Our delicious yogurts, kefirs, and artisan cheeses are available at natural food stores nationwide and hopefully at your favorite store! We sell to distributors, who then sell to stores, so unfortunately we cannot contact stores directly and ask them to carry our products. The dairy industry is quite competitive due to an increasing number of brands and limited shelf space. Stores often do resets to re-evaluate their existing products and consider potential new items. If your store does not carry our products, you – the vocal customer can hugely influence the availability by talking directly with the dairy buyer and requesting the product. If the store is not able to place it on their shelves, oftentimes you can special order a case and they will pass along a case discount to you.

What are probiotics? How many probiotics are in a serving?

Probiotics literally means “life giving,” and our kefir and yogurt contain live and active cultures, also referred to as “friendly bacteria”. For more information visit www.probiotics.org, a website devoted to probiotic research.

When testing our products for probiotic amounts, we use new product as well as product at the end of its “shelf life.” We then average these numbers because batches and probiotic counts can vary.

Kefir – 10 different probiotics = 589.68 billion probiotics per 8oz. serving (average)

Yogurt – 4 different probiotics = 340.2 billion probiotics per 6oz cup (average)

When will you become organic and non-GMO?

We have identified the goal of becoming organic and non-GMO as a priority for the future of Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery. GMOs are not allowed under organic certification, and by becoming certified organic, a manufacturer eliminates any sources of GMO inputs in the process.

We are currently in the process of evaluating what the transition process will involve for the farms. If we find that becoming certified organic is feasible (and we very much hope we will!), it will take some time – most likely several years.

To transition, all seven farms we source our goat milk from, including our own, would need to implement an organic system plan and would go through a mandatory transition period. Since our creamery already is certified organic along with our sister brand, Green Valley Organics, we don’t foresee any delay on the production end.

We have a strong commitment to the healthfulness and quality of our products, to the environment and the quality of life of our people and our animals. Thank you for your patience and ongoing support along this journey.

What is the difference between goat milk and cow milk?

Although cow milk and dairy products are popular in the United States and Western Europe where an abundance of alfalfa and supplementary grain feed are available, they are not so popular in the rest of the world. Fresh goat milk and fresh cow milk have comparable flavor and nutrient content, but goat milk is more digestible because the fat particles are smaller. It is not uncommon for people who have trouble with cow milk to successfully switch to goat milk.

Ingredient FAQs

Why are there 5g of sugar in the plain kefir?

The sugar listed is lactose that occurs naturally in the milk. We do not add sugar.

Why are there 7g of sugar in the plain yogurt?

The sugar listed is lactose that occurs naturally in the milk. We do not add sugar.

Do you offer lactose free products?

Goat milk naturally contains less lactose than cow’s milk, but it is not lactose-free.  Our goat milk yogurt and kefir both contain about 2% lactose.  Under our sister brand name, Green Valley Organics, we produce lactose-free real dairy yogurt, kefir, and sour cream made with cow’s milk.  Visit the website to learn more about these delicious, award-winning dairy products:  http://www.greenvalleylactosefree.com/.

Does goat cheese have lactose?

Goat milk and goat cheese naturally contain less lactose than cow’s milk, but it is not lactose-free.  Aged, hard cheeses naturally have less lactose due to the production process compared with fresh cheeses.

What is dairy? Is goat cheese dairy?

Dairy refers to milk produced by an animal, specifically a mammal such as goats, sheep, cows or even camels and water buffalo. Is goat cheese dairy? Yes!  All mammalian milk is considered dairy but there are differences in butterfat content, lactose, and protein.  That is why some people that are allergic to cow dairy or lactose intolerant to cow dairy can use goat dairy successfully and enjoy the many goat dairy products available.

Why are you not non-GMO verified?

At Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery we are deeply concerned about the widespread use of GMOs in our food system and the lack of GMO labeling. We fully support the Non-GMO Project and the different state initiatives seeking the labeling of GMOs.

Our position is simple: We do not support genetic engineering of food products. The ingredients we use in our goat dairy yogurts, kefirs and cheeses do not contain DNA from GMOs. All of our suppliers provide specifications, which ensure the non-GMO status of the ingredients we add.

Our goats’ diet consists of 70% hay and brush, and 30% grain. The vegetarian grain formula we feed the goats contains no hormones, antibiotics, animal by-products or preservatives. At this time, we cannot guarantee that the goat feed is always free of GMOs.

We are actively working toward becoming organic and non-GMO in the future for the benefit of all. At this time, we are in the process of evaluating what the transition process will involve for the farms and for the creamery. If we find that becoming certified organic is feasible (and we very much hope we will!), it will take some time – most likely several years.

What type of rennet do you use and is it Gluten and GMO free? Are your cheeses kosher?

Rennet is an enzyme used to coagulate milk in cheese making. We use a vegetarian rennet or microbial enzyme which meets kosher standards, is gluten-free and GMO-free.

Why do you add pectin and tapioca starch to your products?

Our yogurts contain small amounts of tapioca starch and pectin to add texture, and to minimize excess whey. Tapioca is a natural starch derived from the root of the Cassava plant, and our pectin is citrus based, primarily lemon. Our kefirs do not contain any tapioca or pectin.

Do your products contain lactose or casein?

Goat milk naturally contains less lactose than cow’s milk, but it is not lactose-free. Our goat milk yogurts and kefirs both contain about 2% lactose. Under our sister brand name, Green Valley Organics®, we produce lactose-free yogurt, kefir, and sour cream made with organic cow’s milk. Visit the website to learn more at Green Valley Lactose Free.

Casein in Goat Milk: Casein is a natural protein that is found in all milk.  Many people have difficulty with Casein especially the Alpha S1 casein found in cow milk and so are allergic to cow dairy. Studies have shown that goat milk is very low in Alpha S1 casein and primarily contains Alpha S2 casein.  That is why many of those allergic to cow dairy may be able to use goat milk products in their diets successfully.

Are your goat milk products Kosher?

Our products are Kosher-Certified for year round use, exclusive of Passover, by the Orthodox Rabbinical Council of San Francisco.We are not Chalav Yisroel certified because it requires that a rabbi be present to supervise the milking and transportation of the milk to the creamery, something that is not financially and logistically feasible for us at this time. RHF Kosher Certificate

Do your products contain gluten?

Redwood Hill Farm dairy products do not contain any gluten. At our certified organic creamery, we do not produce any products that contain gluten. Yogurt, kefir and cheese are naturally low glycemic foods.

What is in your “natural ingredients”?

For our flavored goat milk dairy products, we use fruit preparations that are at the bottom of our yogurts as well as blended into our kefirs. The preparations provide concentrated flavor to our yogurt and kefir, resulting in a better fruit taste. Natural flavors are part of the fruit preparation recipe and serve the purpose of enhancing specific flavors, such as strawberry or blueberry. It is important to know, that these natural flavors are directly derived from fruits or fruit juices, vegetables or vegetable juice, root, leaf or plants. The significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional, i.e. beet juice, annatto extract, etc.

The companies that produce the fruit preparations are very protective of their recipes as they are not able to patent them.  The FDA has very specific regulations ensuring natural flavors ingredients meet its standards, but does not require these companies to disclose their recipes. Of course all ingredients must also meet USDA Organic Standards.

We have been quite frustrated with this policy because transparency is of utmost importance to us. Our goal is to make the least processed most natural and delicious goat milk dairy products we can. We are working closely with the company that makes our dairy fruit blends and they are aware that we intend to share information on all ingredients in our products fruit blends, including the natural flavors used. We hope to be able to accomplish that in the future.

What are probiotics? How many probiotics are in a serving?

Probiotics literally means “life giving,” and our kefir and yogurt contain live and active cultures, also referred to as “friendly bacteria”. For more information visit www.probiotics.org, a website devoted to probiotic research.

When testing our products for probiotic amounts, we use new product as well as product at the end of its “shelf life.” We then average these numbers because batches and probiotic counts can vary.

Kefir – 10 different probiotics = 589.68 billion probiotics per 8oz. serving (average)

Yogurt – 4 different probiotics = 340.2 billion probiotics per 6oz cup (average)

Production FAQs

Do you still sell goat milk?

As of September 14, 2012, we no longer sell our fresh bottled goat milk. Because goat milk production is seasonal, there are times of the year when we have less fresh milk than others. Coupled with the fact that our goat milk yogurt and kefir are very popular, we have decided to discontinue bottling our fresh milk. You may wish to enjoy our delicious Redwood Hill Farm Goat Milk Kefir in place of the milk; many people use our kefir on their cereal, over fruit, and in their smoothies. Thank you for your continued support!

How long do you ferment your kefir and yogurts?

We use the “authentic cup set” method. After vat pasteurization, the milk is cooled to 110-114 degrees and beneficial bacteria (also called cultures or probiotics) are added and incubated at 110 degrees for 5-8 hours until the cultures grow and the product thickens into yogurt or kefir.

Are there seasonal variations with goat milk?

During the winter and early spring, goats naturally produce a higher butterfat and solids content in their milk. This results in thicker yogurts and kefirs and softer cheeses.

During the summer and fall seasons, goats milk has less butterfat due to their natural lactation cycle. We see a lighter, more delicate texture in our yogurt and kefir, and harder cheeses.

What method do you use to pasteurize the milk?

We use the “Vat Pasteurization” method. This requires that the milk be heated to 145 degrees F for a minimum holding of 30 minutes and then immediately chilled. This is the lowest temperature for pasteurization allowable by law. By comparison, HTST or “High Temperature/Short Time” requires that the milk be heated to 162 degrees F for 17 seconds. HTST is the method used most frequently by creameries because of the shorter time. UHT or “Ultra High Temperature” requires heating the milk to 275 degrees F for one second and will render the product virtually sterile for long lasting time on the shelf. We prefer the “Vat Pasteurization” method for our goat milk dairy products and believe it is the best method for preserving the integrity of the milk.

Do you produce any low-fat, non-fat or raw goat milk products?

One of our core company values is to produce healthful and delicious specialty dairy products. All of our products are made with fresh Grade A goat milk, as nature intended. At this time we do not produce any low-fat or non-fat goat milk products.

Our cultured products are made with pasteurized goat milk. In accordance with federal law, all cultured products produced in the U.S. must be made with pasteurized milk. The exception to this is that cheeses may be made with raw milk if aged 60 days or more.Our goat milk feta is made with raw milk and is aged a minimum of 60 days and can be aged up to one year.

Farm FAQs

Do you separate the goat kids from their mothers after birth?

Best practices for raising goat kids at Redwood Hill Farm

A LaMancha & Nubian dairy goat kid at Redwood Hill Farm

LaMancha & Nubian dairy goat kids at Redwood Hill Farm

During the kidding season in the spring, our farm staff checks on the pregnant goats all the time. We have a special night shift from 2-3 am in the morning to make sure someone can assist a goat giving birth even in the middle of the night.

Dairy goats typically give birth to 2-3 kids and begin giving milk. Many of these kids remain on our farm to be raised as the next generation. When the kids are born, they are immediately whisked away from their mother. This is very important, because there is a disease goats can contract called Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus (CAEV). This virus, which is specific to goats and does not affect any other species, is passed through fluids such as milk, saliva and blood.

Symptoms include swelling of the knees, arthritis, seizures, and scar tissue in the udder. CAEV is a serious infection that severely limits a goat’s live span, because it eventually destroys the immune system. It also reduces milk production by about half.

Our program for a CAEV-free herd

Nubian dairy goat kid at Redwood Hill Farm

A Nubian dairy goat kid

When CAEV was discovered 25 years ago, it was estimated that 80% of goats worldwide were infected. We work very hard to keep our herd free of CAEV with our eradication program, which includes the

separation of kids right after birth, feeding with only heat-treated colostrum and milk, annual CAEV testing and best practices in vaccinations.  We work closely with the other goat dairy farmers that supply milk to our creamery to help them with their CAEV eradication programs.

After birth the kids are placed in a special barn with the other kids and are fed their mothers’ colostrum, which has been heated up to make it safe for them. Each feeding is measured to make sure they eat enough. After a few days they are fed pasteurized goat milk and yogurt – we never use any kind of milk replacer. They stay in the barn with the other kids where they have plenty of space to play and roam. As they grow, they are eventually re-united with the rest of the herd.

Do you use artificial insemination with our goats?
Champion line-up at the Sonoma County Fair

Redwood Hill Farm owner Jennifer Bice (on right) showing her champion dairy goat “Rima”

Dairy goats, unlike dairy cows, do not need to be bred every year. After a goat has a kid, the doe can be milked for 2-3 years without having another one. We do this with approximately 30% of the milking herd.

At Redwood Hill Farm we breed the vast majority of our goats naturally. We have an award-winning herd of Alpine, LaMancha, Nubian and Saanen goats and are known internationally for the excellence in our breeding genetics program.

A small percentage of our goats (less than 5%) are bred artificially to match them with top bucks across the country. We do this to bring in new, outstanding genetics and to continue improving our herd.

What happens to the buck kids?

Improving dairy goat herds across the United States and beyond

BuckyBoyJarvis_pstcrdAt Redwood Hill Farm we have an award-winning herd of Alpine, LaMancha, Nubian and Saanen dairy goats and are known internationally for the excellence in our breeding genetics program. Therefore, a high percentage of our buck kids (approximately 50-60%) are sold for breeding all over the United States as well as to Canada, Taiwan, Venezuela and many other countries.

Dairy goats typically give birth to 2-3 kids. All of the doe kids and some of the buck kids  remain on our farm to be raised as the next generation. We also give a number of our buck kids to the other goat dairy farms who supply milk to our creamery to improve their herds. This not only helps them improve the health and quality of their herd, but also the quality of the milk as improved genetics can increase the amount of butterfat and other components in the milk.

Other buck kids are sold to families as pets or to organizations that train them to be horse companions or to transport supplies for backpackers. Only a very few are sold to local farmers who raise them for meat.  There is no veal-type meat production in goat and the animals are not confined to small areas.

What is Certified Humane®?

Driving consumer demand for kinder and more responsible
farm animal practices

Certified Humane® is a food product label awarded by an organization called Humane Farm Animal Care (HFAC), an independent, third-party certification organization based in Virginia. Founded in 1998, Humane Farm Animal Care set out to improve the lives of millions of farm animals enduring inhumane treatment on factory farms across the country.

The program is designed to empower consumers to buy food products with the confidence that they came from a farm with high standards for animal welfare.  By certifying products with the Certified Humane® logo, consumers are given a choice. The goal is to improve the lives of farm animals in food production by driving consumer demand for kinder and more responsible farm animal practices.

The animal welfare standards for Certified Humane® were created by a Scientific Committee comprised of 36 scientists and veterinarians from all over the world.  For goats, requirements include:

  • Animals must receive a nutritious diet free of antibiotics or hormones. They must be raised with shelter, resting areas and space that are sufficient to support their natural behavior.
    Goats, unlike sheep or cattle, do not tolerate rain or wind. Therefore, adequate shelter must be provided at all times to protect them from inclement weather.
  • Being social and gregarious animals, goats must be housed within sight or sound of goats or other animals.
  • Milking, shearing or and clipping procedures must meet HFAC standard.

If you are interested in reading the complete standard for dairy goats, click here.

When we first learned about this program, we realized that the farm practices we had been using for decades were already in compliance with the Certified Humane® standard. To give our consumers the additional confidence of a third-party certification, we became the first goat dairy in the United States to become Certified Humane® in 2005.

What do your goats eat? Is the feed non-GMO?

At Redwood Hill Farm we believe in a natural approach to animal husbandry and our dairy goats have access to pasture and are Certified Humane raised and handled. By nature, goats are browsers and not pasture grazers like cows and sheep. Our dairy goats get some brush in addition to hay; they especially love rose bushes!

The goats’ diet consists of 70% Fiber (brush and various hay varieties) and 30% grain, which includes safflower meal (as the main protein), corn, oats, barley and minerals (no cottonseed meal, canola, soy or sugar beets). Our goats do well and are very healthy on this vegetarian diet.

The ingredients we use in our goat dairy yogurts, kefirs and cheeses do not contain DNA from GMOs. All of our suppliers provide specifications, which ensure the non-GMO status of the ingredients we add.

At this time, we cannot guarantee that the goat feed is always free of GMOs. We are actively working towards becoming organic and non-GMO in the future for the benefit of all.

To learn more about our farm, click the link to view our new video.

Can we visit your farm or creamery?

We are a working farm and creamery and cannot offer tours at all times. We do offer tours of the farm in the spring at our annual Farm Tours, usually in May and June. Until then, click here and enjoy this “virtual tour” of our farm with Farm Manager, Scott Bice.

To learn about different activities which happen year-round in Sonoma County visit FarmTrails.org. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and sign up for our newsletter which comes out every 4-6 weeks for our spring tour dates, specials, and great goat photos and recipes!

Packaging FAQs

What type of materials do you use for your packaging? Are they safe and recyclable?

We use #2 and #5 food grade plastics for our containers and lids. Neither of these contains chloride that releases dioxins when heated, and they are BPA, phthalate, and PVC free. Our foil lids have a protective plastic lining that prevents contact between the yogurt and the foil.

Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery has already accomplished the “reduce” in the “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” slogan by choosing lighter weight #5 plastic for our containers which minimizes the environmental impact of our packaging. Additionally, we have significantly reduced our case packaging!

We encourage consumers to “reuse” yogurt containers to start plants for the garden, for food storage, and other creative uses. Also, other customers have let us know that they donate their saved cups to local schools for art projects!

And last but not least, recycle!! To locate facilities that offer #5 plastic recycling, please visit Earth911.org. This site will direct you to recycling centers for all types of packaging in your region. Simply enter your zip code and the type of material you want to recycle.

What does the date on your packaging mean, and is it safe to eat your products after this date?

The date on every yogurt, kefir, and chèvre is the “best by” date. If the product has not been opened and has been kept properly refrigerated, it may last 7-10 days past the “best by” date. Once opened, products will last longer if stored at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or less. By smelling, tasting, and looking at the appearance, you can use your best judgment to determine the product’s freshness.

For a better understanding of the code dates of our cheeses and how to interpret their meaning, click here.

Goat Cheese FAQs

Is all feta cheese goat cheese?

No, not today.  Originally, all feta was made when the shepherds took the sheep or goats to the mountains for the summer pastures and the feta was made from either milk or a combination of goat and sheep milk.  This is why many people think they have tried goat cheese if they eat feta cheese.  In many locales, feta is still made with goat/sheep milk but in the US, most feta cheese today is made with cow milk.  Our Redwood Hill Farm Goat Milk Feta cheese is the one raw milk cheese that we produce and has won many awards.  See our website for many delicious ways to enjoy!  http://www.redwoodhill.com/recipes

Can you freeze goat cheese?

Yes, the chèvre, which is a fresh spreadable goat cheese, freezes very well.  Always allow it to thaw in the refrigerator, which can take up to 24 hours.

The French-style, rind-ripened goat cheeses can also be frozen, but when thawed do not showcase as well as prior to freezing. The nutrient content will remain the same. A good way to use these cheeses after freezing would be in cooking.

The traditional cheeses such as goat cheddar and our raw milk feta will last 6 months or more in their packaging, so there is no need for freezing.  If the packaging does get opened, freezing could then be an option, but when thawed, they will be drier and best used in cooking.

Is goat cheese pasteurized?

Goat cheese can be made with either pasteurized or raw milk.  Like cow milk cheeses, if the cheese is made with raw milk it must be aged for 60 days or more. This is why fresh cheeses, like chèvre, are always made with pasteurized milk. The label will indicate whether the cheese is made with pasteurized or raw milk. For our pasteurized milk cheeses, we use the “Vat Pasteurization” method. This requires that the milk be heated to 145 degrees F for a minimum holding of 30 minutes and then immediately chilled. This is the lowest temperature for pasteurization allowable by law. By comparison, HTST or “High Temperature/Short Time” requires that the milk be heated to 162 degrees F for 17 seconds. HTST is the method used most frequently by creameries because of the shorter time. UHT or “Ultra High Temperature” requires heating the milk to 275 degrees F for one second and will render the product virtually sterile for long lasting time on the shelf. We prefer the “Vat Pasteurization” method for our goat milk dairy products and believe it is the best method for preserving the integrity of the milk.

Do your products contain lactose or casein?

Goat milk naturally contains less lactose than cow’s milk, but it is not lactose-free. Our goat milk yogurts and kefirs both contain about 2% lactose. Under our sister brand name, Green Valley Organics®, we produce lactose-free yogurt, kefir, and sour cream made with organic cow’s milk. Visit the website to learn more at Green Valley Lactose Free.

Casein in Goat Milk: Casein is a natural protein that is found in all milk.  Many people have difficulty with Casein especially the Alpha S1 casein found in cow milk and so are allergic to cow dairy. Studies have shown that goat milk is very low in Alpha S1 casein and primarily contains Alpha S2 casein.  That is why many of those allergic to cow dairy may be able to use goat milk products in their diets successfully.

Goat Yogurt FAQs

Why are there 7g of sugar in the plain yogurt?

The sugar listed is lactose that occurs naturally in the milk. We do not add sugar.

What are probiotics? How many probiotics are in a serving of your yogurt?

Probiotics literally means “life giving,” and our  yogurt contains live and active cultures, also referred to as “friendly bacteria”. For more information visit www.probiotics.org, a website devoted to probiotic research.

We selected each active probiotic strain for its unique and complementary role for flavor development and synergy. They are: L. Acidophilus,  S. Thermophilus, L. Bulgaricus and  Bifidus. Together, these four probiotic cultures are responsible for the terrific, signature “tang” of the products they’ve cultured and their smooth, creamy textures.

When testing our goat yogurt for probiotic amounts, we use new product as well as product at the end of its “shelf life.” We then average these numbers because batches and probiotic counts can vary.

Redwood Hill Farm yogurt, with four different probiotics, has 340.2 billion probiotics per 6oz cup (average)

Do you still sell goat milk?

As of September 14, 2012, we no longer sell our fresh bottled goat milk. Because goat milk production is seasonal, there are times of the year when we have less fresh milk than others. Coupled with the fact that our goat milk yogurt and kefir are very popular, we have decided to discontinue bottling our fresh milk. You may wish to enjoy our delicious Redwood Hill Farm Goat Milk Kefir in place of the milk; many people use our kefir on their cereal, over fruit, and in their smoothies. Thank you for your continued support!

Do your products contain lactose or casein?

Goat milk naturally contains less lactose than cow’s milk, but it is not lactose-free. Our goat milk yogurts and kefirs both contain about 2% lactose. Under our sister brand name, Green Valley Organics®, we produce lactose-free yogurt, kefir, and sour cream made with organic cow’s milk. Visit the website to learn more at Green Valley Lactose Free.

Casein in Goat Milk: Casein is a natural protein that is found in all milk.  Many people have difficulty with Casein especially the Alpha S1 casein found in cow milk and so are allergic to cow dairy. Studies have shown that goat milk is very low in Alpha S1 casein and primarily contains Alpha S2 casein.  That is why many of those allergic to cow dairy may be able to use goat milk products in their diets successfully.

Why is liquid sometimes on the top of my yogurt when I open it?

It is normal for a bit of liquid (whey) to separate from yogurt. It can occur when there has been pressure applied, the container has been on its side, or when the yogurt has undergone a temperature change. Whey contains many of the important vitamins and nutrients in the yogurt so for the full goat yogurt benefits, it may be delicately folded back in.

What is the difference between goat milk and cow milk?

Although cow milk and dairy products are popular in the United States and Western Europe where an abundance of alfalfa and supplementary grain feed are available, they are not so popular in the rest of the world. Fresh goat milk and fresh cow milk have comparable flavor and nutrient content, but goat milk is more digestible because the fat particles are smaller. It is not uncommon for people who have trouble with cow milk to successfully switch to goat milk.

Goat Kefir FAQs

Why are there 5g of sugar in the plain kefir?

The sugar listed is lactose that occurs naturally in the milk. We do not add sugar.

What are probiotics? How many probiotics are in a serving of your kefir?

Probiotics literally means “life giving,” and our goat yogurt and kefir contain live and active cultures, also referred to as “friendly bacteria”. For more information visit www.probiotics.org, a website devoted to probiotic research.

Flourish® is our proprietary blend of 10 different live and active probiotic strains. We selected each strain for its unique and complementary role for flavor development and synergy. They are: L. Acidophilus, L. Bulgaricus, L. Casei, L. Rhamnosus, L. Lactis, L. Diacetylactis, S. Thermophilus, L. Cremoris, Leuconostoc, and B. Bifidum. Together, this signature blend of 10 probiotic cultures is responsible for the terrific, signature “tang” of the products they’ve cultured and their smooth, creamy textures.

When testing our products for probiotic amounts, we use new product as well as product at the end of its “shelf life.” We then average these numbers because batches and probiotic counts can vary.

Kefir — 10 different probiotics = 589.68 billion probiotics per 8oz. serving (average)

What is kefir?

Goat yogurt and kefir are similar in taste and texture; however kefir is drinkable . . . like a thick smoothie, while yogurt is like custard. The yogurt, with the addition of small amounts tapioca starch and pectin, is thicker. Our kefirs do not contain anything to thicken them.  Our kefirs contain Flourish®, a custom blend of 10 different probiotics, compared to our yogurts which contain 4.  Both are absolutely delicious and contain billions of probiotics in every serving!

Do you still sell goat milk?

As of September 14, 2012, we no longer sell our fresh bottled goat milk. Because goat milk production is seasonal, there are times of the year when we have less fresh milk than others. Coupled with the fact that our goat milk yogurt and kefir are very popular, we have decided to discontinue bottling our fresh milk. You may wish to enjoy our delicious Redwood Hill Farm Goat Milk Kefir in place of the milk; many people use our kefir on their cereal, over fruit, and in their smoothies. Thank you for your continued support!

Do your products contain lactose or casein?

Goat milk naturally contains less lactose than cow’s milk, but it is not lactose-free. Our goat milk yogurts and kefirs both contain about 2% lactose. Under our sister brand name, Green Valley Organics®, we produce lactose-free yogurt, kefir, and sour cream made with organic cow’s milk. Visit the website to learn more at Green Valley Lactose Free.

Casein in Goat Milk: Casein is a natural protein that is found in all milk.  Many people have difficulty with Casein especially the Alpha S1 casein found in cow milk and so are allergic to cow dairy. Studies have shown that goat milk is very low in Alpha S1 casein and primarily contains Alpha S2 casein.  That is why many of those allergic to cow dairy may be able to use goat milk products in their diets successfully.

What is the difference between goat milk and cow milk?

Although cow milk and dairy products are popular in the United States and Western Europe where an abundance of alfalfa and supplementary grain feed are available, they are not so popular in the rest of the world. Fresh goat milk and fresh cow milk have comparable flavor and nutrient content, but goat milk is more digestible because the fat particles are smaller. It is not uncommon for people who have trouble with cow milk to successfully switch to goat milk.