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Recipe: Redwood Hill Farm Kefir & Yuzu Jam Donuts

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes

Donuts for Chinese New Year made with Redwood Hill Farm plain goat yogurt

Donuts… deliciously crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside.

This donut recipe uses a lucky Chinese ingredient eaten on New Year’s Day: orange. The recipe calls for yuzu jam, made with Asian citrus, but you can use any citrus jam that is readily available such as orange marmalade. Oranges and tangerines bring luck, wealth and success to all those that eat them during the New Year.

Redwood Hill Farm plain kefir is the secret ingredient here. The batter should be slightly thick and donuts fried over a low-medium heat to make sure they are completely cooked and fluffy on the inside. You can either mix the yuzu jam in the batter or drizzle over the donuts while still warm. Sprinkle generously with powdered sugar (optional) for extra sweetness.

Happy Year of The Goat, we hope it is filled with luck and delicious new recipes for you!

Recipe: “Lucky 8” Salad With Goat Yogurt Peanut Sauce

Written by Nancy Lorenz on . Posted in Recipes

Redwood Hill Farm "Lucky 8" Salad with Goat Milk Yogurt Peanut Sauce

The number “8” is very lucky for the Chinese, so it’s not unusual to find a delicious dish with eight special ingredients on the table during Chinese New Year. Traditionally, eight ingredients like bamboo shoots, bean shoots and other “lucky” ingredients are stir-fried together to make something truly delicious.

You can choose any ingredients you love, but we like the crunch of the cucumbers, the slightly spicy radish wedges and the sweetness of the tomatoes when paired with the peanut and goat yogurt sauce. The egg ribbons add an Asian flavor to this salad, and the addition of fresh herbs give an added freshness with every bite. The carrots are also important since they are thought to bring luck.

Jennifer Bice named 2014 Leadership in Agriculture Award Winner

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Company News, In the News


Jennifer will be honored at the 42nd Annual Ag-BBQ

We’re so happy to share that the Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce recently announced Redwood Hill Farm owner and CEO Jennifer Bice will receive the Leadership in Agriculture award at this year’s Agri-Business BBQ on July 29th! The 42nd Annual Agri-Business BBQ honoring the diverse and pivotal role of the agriculture community in shaping the quality of life here in Sonoma County, will take place at Shone Farm, Santa Rosa Junior College’s 365-acre outdoor learning laboratory. Select HERE for more details on the awards event in July.

Jennifer began showing and learning about dairy goats as a young Sonoma County 4H member

Jennifer began showing and learning about dairy goats as Sonoma County 4-H member

In 1978, Jennifer Lynn Bice assumed ownership of Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery, Inc., the family farm and Grade A goat dairy the Bice family started in Sonoma County in 1968, and never looked back. Along with her late husband, Steven Schack, Jennifer expanded the business to produce a greater variety of goat milk products, and diversified the dairy goat-breeding program.

Today Redwood Hill Farm is owned and operated by Jennifer, along with five of her siblings that worked to establish Redwood Hill Farm in the 1960’s.  In addition, more than 50 dedicated employees now run the day-to-day operations at the Certified Humane® farm and state-of-the-art organic creamery in Sebastopol. Promoting the benefits of goat milk products and developing a genetics program of excellence for the Redwood Hill Farm herd remain her top priorities, and this commitment has positioned Redwood Hill Farm at the forefront of the dairy goat industry.

Honoring Zimba

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Life on the Farm


Our Zimba passed away at the old goat age of 12 years with friends, herdmates, and sister Zoe by her side

Born in the Spring of 2002 in a kidding that produced twin does, Zimba (SG Redwood Hills Ransom Zimba) is the daughter of the sweet doe Grand Champion Redwood Hills Samurai Zariba and her sire, the wild and reckless buck Willow Run Atlas Ransom.

The Olive Harvest at Redwood Hill Farm

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Life on the Farm


In Italy there are many festivals in November to celebrate the olive harvest, when family and friends gather to harvest the plump green and purple fruit by hand.

It was a cold but sunny morning three years ago, when we started our own family tradition: picking the fruit of our young trees by hand to make “green gold”—the buttery, peppery, and delicious olive oil.


This years harvest with everyone helping—how many non-human animals can you spot?

This year’s harvest at Redwood Hill Farm with family, friends and farm animals

This year, the harvest came earlier than expected, with the olive oil extracted at a local press in Hopland on November 4th. The harvest amount varies each year—the trees are growing and produce a little more each year. Weather conditions and other factors can also determine total pounds that are produced.

Looking through an olive tree at Nicole Bice helping her dad, Farm Manager Scott Bice with the olive harvest.

Looking through an olive tree at Nicole Bice who helps her dad, Farm Manager Scott Bice, with the 2015 olive harvest

We have five different varieties at the farm, including Frantaio, Leccino, Maurino, Pendolino and Ascalano, which make a great blend of extra virgin olive oil. Olives start out green, then turn purple and later black. We always look for a good balance of green and purple olives, to get the flavor profile we are looking. Maybe, one day, we will be marinating our feta with it.


The 2015 olive harvest is loaded into the farm truck for delivery to the Hopland olive press.

We harvested 35 olive trees that have been in the ground for nearly 5 years as well as another 60 that have been in the ground for 2-3 years. All in all we were able to fill buckets that hold approximately 45 lbs., getting six gallon of oil. The precious bottles are only opened for holiday-themed potlucks or gatherings for family and friends, which lasts us throughout the year.

Peanut Butter Pistachio Goat Milk Fudge

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes


Fudge for the holidays, with a twist: made with cultured goat milk kefir

We’ve added pistachios to a classic peanut butter fudge recipe using our fresh, award-winning, plain goat milk kefir instead of evaporated milk. The goat milk kefir works beautifully—the resulting fudge is smooth, creamy with a nice peanut-butter flavor and a hint of tartness. Chopped, unsalted pistachios give just the right amount of contrasting “crunch” to the creamy confection and are very pretty sprinkled over the top as a garnish. Adapted from goat milk fudge recipe on food.com.

This fudge makes a great homemade gift—just be sure to save some for yourself.

Vegetable & Fresh Chèvre Gratin

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes


This rustic recipe has been a favorite of mine since my long-time friend and goat cheese lover, Helen Jackson, gave it to me a few years ago. It makes a great vegetarian dinner or side dish and shows off how versatile cooking with fresh chèvre can be. Tip: do use a mandoline for slicing vegetables if you have one—this recipe is best when the vegetables are sliced very thin.

California Drought and Redwood Hill Farm — Part 2: Conserving Water

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Life on the Farm

Redwood Hill Farm Gravenstein Apple tree

At Redwood Hill Farm, we’ve been farming gardens and orchards just as long as dairy farming—nearly 50 years.

It is typical in Sonoma County to experience an extended dry period each summer without rainfall for many months. We are therefore accustomed to using water wisely and have implemented different water conservation systems which include composting, drip irrigation, reclaiming and reusing water, and dry farming. The severe drought conditions of the last four years have challenged us to perfect these techniques as we make the most of the water we have, now more than ever.

Compost ageing near the orchard at Redwood Hill FarmOne of the most effective water conservation programs we have in place at our Sonoma County farm near Sebastopol is composting. Composting enables us to use less water while enhancing the cultivation of some of our goat feed, growing our own food, and enriching our farmland overall.  Composting is a natural process that turns vegetable matter or manure into a dark rich substance compost or humus.

Moving compost at Redwood Hill FarmWe lovingly call our compost “black gold”: Straw and goat manure are gleaned from our loafing barns and are composted over time in large piles and then spread throughout our gardens, apple and olive orchards. Composting conserves water as it decreases evaporation of moisture from the soil and enables the soil to hold more water in. In addition, it reduces water runoff and topsoil erosion during the rainy season.

barn compost spread under the olive orchard drip lines at Redwood Hill FarmAs rainwater is caught and filtered through the straw down into the soil, orchards and gardens are fed with the nutrients from the rotting compost. Over the winter and into the next spring, the straw and manure compost continues to break down. The bottom layers, with the help of worms and other composting insects, turn the compost slowly into rich, loamy topsoil.

Raspberries at the Redwood Hill Farm gardens

Our Olalee blackberries, raspberries and blueberry shrubs, all benefit from a deep bed of compost.

mulched raised be at Redwood Hill Farm garden

Up to 70% of water can evaporate from the soil on a hot day if there is no mulch as a protective layer on top.

In addition to mulching our food and flower garden boxes at the farm, we use drip irrigation systems throughout the farm for our young, olive orchard as well as for the raised garden beds, blueberry shrubs and other berries that we grow for food each year. Drip irrigation, also known as “trickle irrigation” is a simple, but very effective system that consists of a network of tubes and emitters to focus the water close to the plants and young trees. This allows the water to drip slowly in those areas. Compared to traditional, overhead watering this method is very efficient in reducing evaporation and delivering only the necessary amount of water directly to the base of the plant, just where it is needed.

Scott Bice reusing water reclaimed in the dairy barn

Farm Manager Scott Bice washing-up dairy walkways by reusing water from the reclaim storage tank.

In the dairy milking parlor we continue our water conservation efforts by reclaiming and reusing water from our equipment’s automatic wash cycle. After the wash cycle, the water is directed to a holding tank where any sediment settles. The grey water from that tank is siphoned, pumped and then used to wash the floors of the dairy barn each day.

A close-up image of Redwood Hill Farm apple tree ready to pickSonoma County has long been known for the delicious Gravenstein apple’s commercial production and growing apples has been a tradition from Redwood Hill Farm’s very beginning, almost five decades ago. We have over 15 different apple varieties in our abundant orchard, which is entirely dry farmed. Dry farming is a system of growing crops in low water or arid regions and means that no water or artificial irrigation are used on the trees except for the water they receive with the winter and spring rains. While the fruit size is typically smaller than an irrigated orchard, the yields are very good.

Turkeys enjoy scratching in compost at Redwood Hill FarmHealthy topsoil is critical to sustainable dry farming, and preserving the soil is considered an important long-term goal of our orchard’s dry farmed operation. We use no- or reduced tilling, and straw compost spreading throughout to protect and replenish the orchard’s valuable topsoil. Our free-range chickens as well as the rabbits, deer, turkeys and other wildlife that live in and around the farm appreciate our efforts as they enjoy the abundance of the land.

As we continue to harvest our apples and notice the leaves that begin to turn to their bright fall colors, we’re hopefully optimistic for more rainfall this winter. Meteorologists are predicting with a high certainty that an “El Niño” weather pattern is developing. This means winter and spring rainfall for the West Coast – and hopefully lots of it to soak the fields and gardens on our farm once again.


Rhubarb Upside-Down Cake

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes

Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

We’ve combined fresh-from-the-garden rhubarb with a yogurt-vanilla cake batter, for a new dessert recipe that is as pretty to look at as it is delicious to eat. Enjoy this seasonal, easy upside-down cake with a scoop of homemade goat milk ice-cream for easy living! This recipe was adapted from a favorite of ours published by the New York Times. It’s a classic.

Your Top Sustainable Cheese Producer

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Company News, In the News

CCM Issue 3 Cover

We are thrilled to be in Issue 3 of Conscious Company Magazine as a handful of the nations top sustainable cheese producers! Redwood Hill Farm Owner and CEO Jennifer Bice was interviewed about her woman-owned company and her 45+ year commitment to sustainability and the environment.

You can pick up a copy at Whole Foods Market, Sprouts, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, and other local retailers—you’ll be supporting sustainable businesses.

CLICK HERE to read the full article.

California Drought and Redwood Hill Farm

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Life on the Farm

A load of Tagasaste ready to haul to the goats

Part 1:  Growing Our Own Drought Resilient Goat Feed – Tagasaste

Conserving precious water is on our minds as we are facing another year of severe drought in California. We’re resilient folks, and are constantly looking at ways in which we can do our part at the Farm as well as at the creamery. Redwood Hill Farm Manager Scott Bice’s most recent water-saving project on the farm is one we’re very excited about. We are now growing some of our goat’s feed, a drought-tolerant, leafy shrub called Tagasaste, right on the farm – and the goats love to eat it.

Recipe: Goat Cheese Stuffed Apricots

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes


Right now, late spring, is the time for apricots here in Sonoma County—and locally grown just picked off the tree don’t stay around at fruit stands of farmer’s markets for very long. Savor them while you can still find them!

At the farm we’re lucky to have young tree that produces a little more fruit for us each season. We’re growing peaches and nectarines in our orchard as well, and all pair beautifully with goat cheese, especially Redwood Hill Farm Chèvre.

Here is a simple yet elegant recipe that celebrates this great flavor combination. This recipe actually uses a blend of chèvre and cream cheese (but you could use all Chèvre if  you like). We prefer to use the cream cheese we make right here at our creamery; Green Valley Organics Lactose-Free cream cheese, but any good quality cream cheese will work. Experiment with your own favorite herbs, nuts and seeds, but remember to use a light hand so as not to overpower this classic fruit/cheese combo. Fast and easy to make for a crowd, too.

This recipe and variations were inspired by and reprinted with permission from the blog “In Erika’s Kitchen”.