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Recipe: Redwood Hill Farm Kefir & Yuzu Jam Donuts

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes

Donuts for Chinese New Year made with Redwood Hill Farm plain goat yogurt

Donuts… deliciously crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside.

This donut recipe uses a lucky Chinese ingredient eaten on New Year’s Day: orange. The recipe calls for yuzu jam, made with Asian citrus, but you can use any citrus jam that is readily available such as orange marmalade. Oranges and tangerines bring luck, wealth and success to all those that eat them during the New Year.

Redwood Hill Farm plain kefir is the secret ingredient here. The batter should be slightly thick and donuts fried over a low-medium heat to make sure they are completely cooked and fluffy on the inside. You can either mix the yuzu jam in the batter or drizzle over the donuts while still warm. Sprinkle generously with powdered sugar (optional) for extra sweetness.

Happy Year of The Goat, we hope it is filled with luck and delicious new recipes for you!

Recipe: “Lucky 8″ Salad With Goat Yogurt Peanut Sauce

Written by Nancy Lorenz on . Posted in Recipes

Redwood Hill Farm "Lucky 8" Salad with Goat Milk Yogurt Peanut Sauce

The number “8” is very lucky for the Chinese, so it’s not unusual to find a delicious dish with eight special ingredients on the table during Chinese New Year. Traditionally, eight ingredients like bamboo shoots, bean shoots and other “lucky” ingredients are stir-fried together to make something truly delicious.

You can choose any ingredients you love, but we like the crunch of the cucumbers, the slightly spicy radish wedges and the sweetness of the tomatoes when paired with the peanut and goat yogurt sauce. The egg ribbons add an Asian flavor to this salad, and the addition of fresh herbs give an added freshness with every bite. The carrots are also important since they are thought to bring luck.

Jennifer Bice named 2014 Leadership in Agriculture Award Winner

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Company News, In the News

RedwoodHillFarm_JenniferBice_AgBsLeaderAward

Jennifer will be honored at the 42nd Annual Ag-BBQ

We’re so happy to share that the Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce recently announced Redwood Hill Farm owner and CEO Jennifer Bice will receive the Leadership in Agriculture award at this year’s Agri-Business BBQ on July 29th! The 42nd Annual Agri-Business BBQ honoring the diverse and pivotal role of the agriculture community in shaping the quality of life here in Sonoma County, will take place at Shone Farm, Santa Rosa Junior College’s 365-acre outdoor learning laboratory. Select HERE for more details on the awards event in July.

Jennifer began showing and learning about dairy goats as a young Sonoma County 4H member

Jennifer began showing and learning about dairy goats as Sonoma County 4-H member

In 1978, Jennifer Lynn Bice assumed ownership of Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery, Inc., the family farm and Grade A goat dairy the Bice family started in Sonoma County in 1968, and never looked back. Along with her late husband, Steven Schack, Jennifer expanded the business to produce a greater variety of goat milk products, and diversified the dairy goat-breeding program.

Today Redwood Hill Farm is owned and operated by Jennifer, along with five of her siblings that worked to establish Redwood Hill Farm in the 1960’s.  In addition, more than 50 dedicated employees now run the day-to-day operations at the Certified Humane® farm and state-of-the-art organic creamery in Sebastopol. Promoting the benefits of goat milk products and developing a genetics program of excellence for the Redwood Hill Farm herd remain her top priorities, and this commitment has positioned Redwood Hill Farm at the forefront of the dairy goat industry.

California Drought and Redwood Hill Farm

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Life on the Farm

A load of Tagasaste ready to haul to the goats

Part 1:  Growing Our Own Drought Resilient Goat Feed – Tagasaste

Conserving precious water is on our minds as we are facing another year of severe drought in California. We’re resilient folks, and are constantly looking at ways in which we can do our part at the Farm as well as at the creamery. Redwood Hill Farm Manager Scott Bice’s most recent water-saving project on the farm is one we’re very excited about. We are now growing some of our goat’s feed, a drought-tolerant, leafy shrub called Tagasaste, right on the farm – and the goats love to eat it.

Scott Bice evaluating Tagasaste

Farm Manager Scott Bice recording plant growth before cutting.

Chamaecytisus palmensis, “Tagasaste”, is a small-spreading evergreen tree that can grow 9-12 feet high. A native plant of the Canary Islands, Tagasaste is grown and used widely for animal feed in New Zealand as well as in Australia and other parts of the world. (Cytisus proliferus is another varietal, and it is also commonly known as Tree Lucerne)

Tagasaste is also a well known “fertilizer tree”. Fertilizer trees are used in agroforestry and permaculture designs to improve the condition of soils on farmland. As a member of the legume family, it is a nitrogen fixer: it captures nitrogen from the air and puts it in the soil through the roots and falling leaves. The trees can also bring nutrients from deeper in the soil up to the surface for other crops with roots that can’t reach that depth. (Source: New Zealand Tree Crops Association · NZTCA )

Scott Bice harvesting Tagasaste

For harvesting, we cut the shrubby trees down to about 4 ft., then allow them to regenerate growth.

At Redwood Hill Farm, we’ve started with half an acre trial in an open area of our apple orchard. The trees love the loamy soil, have proved to use little water once established, and are adapting well.

A load of Tagasaste ready to haul to the goats

A full load, next stop will be the goats!

Besides a green feed crop for animals, Tagasaste provides shade and shelter, controls erosion, and serves as habitat for birds, some of which eat and control pests.

Does in the barn feeding on freshly cut Tagasaste

Our milking does line up and voraciously feed on the Tagasaste, as Scott fills the hay mangers.

There are multiple reasons we decided to plant Tagasaste trees on our farm:

  • They are perennial shrubs that need very little water and that, once sheared, re-grow and produce more forage on less acreage than traditional goat feed like alfalfa and grass hay. In our northern California climate, growth slows during the shorter and colder days.  It is evergreen, but we harvest just 7-8 months of the year.
  • High in protein, Tagasaste is nutrient-dense—an important factor for our goat’s diet.
  • With Tagasaste we can eliminate a portion of the alfalfa and other hays that are otherwise trucked in for the goats. Because of the drought, feed prices are ever rising – this doesn’t only reduce our carbon footprint, but is a good business decision as well.
  • Tagasaste blooms are high in pollen and nectar for our bees at a time when other sources are scarce; flowering occurs from Winter to very early Spring.

Our does love the Tagasaste

And the final reason we’re excited about Tagasaste? Our goats love it!

 

 

 

Recipe: Goat Cheese Stuffed Apricots

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes

Chevre-Stuffed-Apricots-wPistachios

Right now, late spring, is the time for apricots here in Sonoma County—and locally grown just picked off the tree don’t stay around at fruit stands of farmer’s markets for very long. Savor them while you can still find them!

At the farm we’re lucky to have young tree that produces a little more fruit for us each season. We’re growing peaches and nectarines in our orchard as well, and all pair beautifully with goat cheese, especially Redwood Hill Farm Chèvre.

Here is a simple yet elegant recipe that celebrates this great flavor combination. This recipe actually uses a blend of chèvre and cream cheese (but you could use all Chèvre if  you like). We prefer to use the cream cheese we make right here at our creamery; Green Valley Organics Lactose-Free cream cheese, but any good quality cream cheese will work. Experiment with your own favorite herbs, nuts and seeds, but remember to use a light hand so as not to overpower this classic fruit/cheese combo. Fast and easy to make for a crowd, too.

This recipe and variations were inspired by and reprinted with permission from the blog “In Erika’s Kitchen”.

RECIPE: Lavender Blueberry Jam with Goat Cheese Crostini

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes

BlueberryJam_Crostini

Lavender is blooming at our farm and local blueberries are ripening around the county. I was recently inspired to try this very seasonal and simple appetizer recipe courtesy of  Patty James Catering, of a lavender & blueberry jam on crostini spread with Plain or Three Peppercorn Chèvre goat cheese. It is fabulous! For a light summer supper, simply pair with a salad and a crisp, white wine or sparkling juice. Patty James is a nutritionist, chef and author whose blog and videos are simply wonderful. Click here to vist her blog “Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives”.

Latest Update: Recall of 3lb Raw Goat Milk Feta in Brine – Lot Code #14000610

Written by Helen Lentze on . Posted in Company News

Redwood-Hill-Farm-Feta-Bucket

Updated 6/24/15 9:16am by Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery

June 19, 2015

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

REDWOOD HILL FARM & CREAMERY, INC. RECALLS 3LB RAW GOAT MILK FETA IN BRINE DUE TO POSSIBLE HEALTH RISK

June 19, 2015 – Sebastopol, CA – Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery, Inc. is voluntarily recalling its 3lb Raw Goat Milk Feta in Brine buckets, with lot code #14000610, out of an abundance of caution concerning test results indicating the presence of Listeria monocytogenes. The product comes in a white plastic bucket marked with a white lot code sticker on the top, reading lot code #14000610. Two buckets are shipped per case in a brown cardboard box with the brand sticker on the side and lot code sticker on the top (see picture below).

Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery is not aware of any illness complaints to date in connection with this notice and lot code #14000610. The recalled product is 3lb Raw Goat Milk Feta in Brine buckets – no other products are included in this recall. This product is a wholesale item and was sold to three distributors in Northern California.

While this product is a wholesale item sold by Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery, three store locations in Marin and San Francisco Counties (only) have purchased and re-packed this feta in clear, deli-style containers. The containers may be labeled Raw Goat Milk Feta – Redwood Hill on the store’s own labels and dated between April 28th and June 18th, 2015.

The three store locations are:

  • Cowgirl Creamery – Ferry Building, San Francisco
  • Good Earth Natural Foods, Fairfax
  • Bom Dia, San Francisco

This voluntary recall has been initiated due to test results indicating the presence of Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery has notified its distributors and is taking this voluntary action as a precautionary measure. We are cooperating fully with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as well as with the California Departments of Food & Agriculture.

Consumers who purchased any of the product at the stores identified above are urged to dispose of them or return them to the store for a full refund. Consumers may also contact Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery at 707-823-8250 (Monday – Friday 9am-5pm PDT) or send an email to question@redwoodhill.com .

 

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CONTACT:

Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery, Inc.

Consumer: 707-823-8250

Media: 707-823-8250 x107

Email: question@redwoodhill.com

Recipe: Goat Cheese and Chive Bread

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes

RedwoodHillFarm_ChiveChevreBread

This bread was developed as a request from Jennifer Bice and Steven Schack of Redwood Hill Farm for the annual Goat Milk Producers Convention which was held in Santa Rosa in 1990 at the Landmark Winery. It first appeared in print in Brother Juniper’s Bread Book: Slow Rise as Method and Metaphor by Peter Reinhart. At that time we made a goat milk ricotta, or as we liked to call it “rigoatta”, and the original recipe was developed using that ricotta goat cheese.

10 Fun Facts About Goat Kids

Written by David Bice on . Posted in Life on the Farm

Farm kid Nicole holding one of ther favorite goats

How much do you know about goat kids? At Redwood Hill Farm we’ve been raising dairy goat kids since the mid 1960’s, and over the years have learned much about these intelligent, cute and cuddly young animals. Here’s our ‘top ten’ of fun facts about goat kids.

Humans and goats have enjoyed a close relationship for thousands of years. Nicole Bice, pictured left, and her brother Colton, below, are the next generation of human kids growing up with goat kids on our Certified Humane® farm—kids playing with kids, living and learning together on the farm.

 

Recipe: Mango Lassi Goat Yogurt Pops

Written by Sharon Bice on . Posted in Recipes

RedwoodHillFarm_MangoYogurtPops

A creamy, naturally sweet goat yogurt popsicle—with flavors of your favorite mango lassi yogurt drink. Fresh mango is paired with coconut milk and drained Redwood Hill Farm Goat Yogurt for a warm weather, low sugar and healthful treat that kids of all ages will love to make as well as eat.

Our Goat Milk’s Journey, from farm to you.

Written by David Bice on . Posted in Life on the Farm

RedwoodHillFarm_MilkHauler

by David Bice

Redwood Hill Farm has been a family farm for over 45 years. It began in 1968 when our parents, Cynthia and Kenneth Bice (with then seven kids), moved from Los Angeles to Sonoma County and bought their very first goat named “Flopsy”. As a family and later under the leadership of oldest sister, Jennifer Bice, we have been making our cultured yogurt, kefir and artisan cheese for our goat milk loving customers since the early 1970’s. We invite you on a journey to follow our fresh goat milk as it travels from our Certified Humane® goat farm in Sebastopol, CA, to your neighborhood store.